Dear Candidate,

Thank you again for submitting an application to the Smart Cities Challenge. We are happy to confirm the eligibility of the application. It will now move to the evaluation by our Jury. Minister Amarjeet Sohi announced the membership of the Jury on April 26, 2018.

To meet the Smart Cities Challenge goal of openness and transparency and to encourage dialogue among residents and stakeholders, all eligible applications will be required to be posted online by the applicant. Please do so now at the address provided in your application. The content must be identical to what was submitted and cover Questions 1 to 10 at a minimum. A full list of eligible applications will be posted shortly on the Challenge platform.

As always, please do not hesitate to contact us at infc.sc-vi.infc@canada.ca for questions or comments.

All the best,

The Smart Cities Challenge Team

Infrastructure Canada

infc.sc-vi.infc@canada.ca

Frog Lake First Nations has submitted the following application for funding from the Smart Cities Challenge.

Applicant information

Question 1
Please provide information on the community that is submitting this application. If this application is being submitted by a group of communities, add each community separately using the button. If this application is being submitted by a regional entity, please include the name of the regional entity with each individual community (e.g. City of Dunn/Smith Region). Do not include the regional entity as a separate, stand-alone community.
Community (Frog Lake First Nation)
Name of community Frog Lake First Nation
Province or Territory Alberta
Population based on 2755
Indigenous community Yes

Question 2
Please select a prize category. $5 million (population under 30,000 residents)

Problem definition

Question 3
Please define your Challenge Statement in a single sentence that guides your preliminary proposal. It should describe the outcome (or outcomes) you hope to achieve. A problem with garbage disposal and collection in Frog Lake must be addressed for the health and safety of all community members. Frog Lake will enjoy a clean, healthy, safe and aesthesically pleasing environment through the Smart City Challenge. Frog Lake youth will be involved through project implementation and training.

Question 4

Please describe the outcome (or outcomes) your proposal seeks to achieve by elaborating on your Challenge Statement.

This section should include:
•Specific goals you hope to achieve by implementing your proposal, justifying both the level of ambition and the achievability of the outcome (or outcomes) sought.
•Baseline data and evidence to establish the current state with respect to the metrics used in your Challenge Statement, and context around the outcome (or outcomes) sought.
•Evidence to support the selection of this/these outcome (or outcomes) over others, in reference to the needs of the community.
•Rationale for applying a smart city approach to achieving the identified outcome (or outcomes).
•Strategy for measuring progress toward outcome (or outcomes) and achievement of outcome (or outcomes).
Goal 1: Raise awareness of the impacts of improper collection disposal and collection on the heath and safety of residents and to the environment.
Goal 2: Motivate political leadership, social and health staff to support the Smart City Challenge.
Goal 3: Develop a community communication strategy to inform the residents for Frog Lake and partner communities of the challenge and obtain their support.
Goal 4: Engage and encourage the participation of neighboring First Nations communities.
Goal 5: Eliminate the garbage and waste found in abandoned homes, the main cemetery and side roads of Frog Lake as well as partner communities who are experiencing the same problem.
Goal 6: Frog Lake residents and the members of the partner communities will take pride in clean, uncluttered communities.
Goal 7: Train and engage the Frog Lake youth and youth in partnering communities in proper waste collection and disposal.
Goal 8: To examine the feasibility of a regular recycling program for the Frog Lake community and partner communities.
Goal 9: Train the youth of all partnering communities to manage landscape sites where garbage was disposed and improve the appearance of those sites.

In 2015, Frog Lake completed a landfill survey, with an emphasis at the time on contents, quantity and water concerns.
In a Frog Lake 2015 band councillor report, under a section titled abandoned residential sites, a concern was highlighted that these houses need to be reclaimed due to safety issues with the threat to livestock and wildlife. (This is a problem as well in Frog Lake’s neighboring/partner communities).
A Frog Lake representative has collected a number of photos that details the number of abandoned houses and their derelict condition, and shows the dangers that garbage in these abandoned houses can pose to livestock and humans.
The Chief of Frog Lake and Band Council have demonstrated their support for this proposal and have submitted a letter of support, and will encourage their partner communities to engage in the Smart City Challenge if successful.

Geospatial information is geography and mapping and is “place based” or “locational” information.
Use of global positioning system (GPS) and geographic information systems (GIS) that accurately collects, stores, retrieves and displays vast amounts of information in a spatial context would be useful, for example to map out the current existing unofficial dump sites and abandoned residential units of all the communities.

The number of abandoned houses and unofficial dump sites will be reduced in the Frog Lake community and partner communities. Political leadership and community members of Frog Lake and their partner communities will gain a better understanding of the dangers of unsafe dumping practices and enjoy a regular garbage pick up and disposal. Youth unemployment rates in all communities will be reduced from the current 80% by at least 50%.
Data generated will be used as a basis for new land-use planning policies, for the current dump site and abandoned house reclamation, resulting in increased community pride and development.

Question 5

Please describe how your community residents have shaped your Challenge Statement. Describe your plans for continuing to engage and involve them in your final proposal going forward.

This section should include:
•Descriptions of previous engagement with residents, businesses, organizations, and other stakeholders on topics related to the Challenge Statement.
•Descriptions of feedback that came to light through past engagement processes.
•Links between the Challenge Statement and engagement feedback.
•Evidence of efforts made to be inclusive and to represent the community’s diversity.
•Plans to sustain engagement through the development and implementation of the final proposal.
Initial engagement with Frog Lake residents was completed via a FaceBook group titled Frog Lake Band, which currently has 1,202 active members, with most living on the reserve. A question was posted as to what Frog Lake residents viewed as priorities or needs of the community. Frog Lake in the past published a quarterly newsletters that was sent out to the community members, including those residing off-reserve. However, currently, Frog Lake does not have a newsletter but there is discussion of starting it up again. Band Council meetings are held on a quarterly basis to address issues of concern and to apprise the members of any new developments that may have an impact on them. The Chief and Council are the governing body of the community and are guided by an Elders council and Youth council. Frog Lake will take the lead in this initiative as most partnering communities all located within a radius of 150 kms and experience similar problems but in varying degrees.

The Morning Sky Health and Wellness Centre in Frog Lake provides health care services to the members in the Cree tradition that provides services in a safe, respectful and wholistic manner. Among other community services, Frog Lake has a Public Works department with a vision that states, “A good public works infrastructure is essential to the health, safety and well-being of any community. Unless, the community has a solid basis of well maintained roads, good water supply, sound sewage and solid waste disposal and a workable planning system, among other things, improved social well-being and economic expansion will be difficult, if not impossible to achieve and sustain.”

The mandate of the Public Works department is to provide services related to water supply, water and septic system assistance, solid waste disposal and maintenance of roads, water and sanitation systems. However, the solid waste disposal or garbage is not being properly managed and some of the Frog Lake residents are dumping their solid waste and garbage in abandoned houses and side roads. Further, domestic and wild animals are free to roam in public areas, such as the cemetery, and leave their waste exposed. This is a health and environmental concern for the citizens of Frog Lake.

The Frog Lake community has entered into a contract with the Seven Lakes company to pick up and dispose of the garbage. The Seven Lakes Oilfield Services in Cold Lake, Alberta is co-owned by seven different First Nations that include: Saddle Lake, Goodfish Lake, Kehewin, Frog Lake, Beaver Lake, Heart Lake and Cold Lake and is a subsidiary of Primco Dene Ltd. Seven Lakes Oilfield services offers a variety of services including waste management and vegetation control. However, a band councillor indicated that Seven Lakes is not consistent in their waste management services, therefore, residents dump their waste in abandoned houses and on side roads posing health, safety and environmental risks.

Frog Lake has already established partnerships with all neighboring six communities who are amalgamated under the Treaty 6 Confederacy as well as being an active member of the Tribal Chiefs Ventures Inc.(TCVI). The shareholders of TCVI, which is a not-for-profit corporation, includes Frog Lake, Beaver Lake, Cold Lake, Kehewin, Heart Lake and Whitefish Lake. These member shareholders meet twice a month to discuss common issues and concerns in all areas and to provide direction and guidance to the tribal council on how to move forward.

The goals of TCVI, and in line with the Smart City Challenge, are:
– To support the collective Treaty interests of the Tribal Chiefs Association;
– To establish individual and joint ventures that will benefit the member First Nations;
– To coordinate efforts to assure accountability and transparency are being fulfilled;
– To develop economic capacity amongst member First Nations both collectively and independently;
– To provide advisory and other services to member First Nations as directed.

The TCVI have established partnerhips and affiliates, namely:
Member First Nations; Blue Quills First Nation college, Tribal Chiefs employment and training services association; Tribal Chiefs education foundation; Tribal Chiefs Child and Family Services East and West organizations; Aboriginal Affairs and Norhern Development Canada; Environmental Canada; Health Canada; Natural Resources Canada; Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Develoment; Alberta Health services; Alberta Aboriginal Relations; Alberta Research Council; University of Alberta; Universtiy of Ottawa; YMCA northern Alberta; Drug Smart Pharmacy; City of Edmonton; Aspen View School Division; Lakeland School Division; Northern Lights School Division; St. Paul Education; Yellowhead Tribal Council; and a number of non-governmental organizations.

On January 23, 2008, the Chiefs of TCVI and Chiefs of the Yellowhead Tribal Council entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Minister of Environment, Government of Alberta. Each year an operating plan has been developed to gather and provide information on a government to government basis through joint dialogue with YTC, TCV and GOA – Ministry of Environment. A Water workshop was held in March 2016 where information was exchanged by the First Nations and the Government. As a result of this MOU, TCV and YTC have held joint tribal council meetings to address environmental issues of common concerns, as well as Chiefs/Minister of Environment meetings to discuss the political strategies required to further the MOU.
Currently, Frog Lake is in the process of hiring a qualified First Nation consultants/team who will oversee and guide the implementation of the final proposal, if they are successful.

Frog Lake members have expressed concern with the appearance of their community and believe that improvements in the Elders units and local cemetery needs to be made. Garbage and refuse thrown on side roads has been noted as an eye sore to the community members, as well as mounting garbage being dumped in abandoned homes.

Preliminary proposal details

Question 6

Please describe your preliminary proposal and its activities or projects.

This section should include:
•Planned activities or projects to achieve the outcome (or outcomes) set out in the Challenge Statement.
•Clear links from the identified projects to the attainment of the outcome (or outcomes).
•Scope and size of each planned project in your preliminary proposal, describing how it is feasible and suitable for achieving the outcome (or outcomes) in a manner that is impactful for the community, ambitious, and transformative.
•Measures put in place to 1) make the proposal open, interoperable, scalable, and replicable or a description of your plan to do so going forward for the benefit of your own community and other communities in Canada; and 2) enable other uses of the technology, innovation, and data in your proposal.
There is a real need in the community to learn about the negative impacts that inadequate waste management has on the health of individuals and the environment. A neglected community has an impact on an individual’s pride of their community and perpetuates an ongoing cycle of neglect. For example, the one and only local community cemetery, which is viewed as being sacred ground, is improperly maintained and is not fenced in allowing livestock to wander freely about and leave animal waste on the graves. This also poses a health risk to the people and is contrary to the beliefs and values of the Frog Lake residents about the land where their ancestors and family members are buried as being ‘sacred.’

Currently, there are fifteen abandoned homes in Frog Lake and an estimated eleven unofficial dump sites. In these abandoned homes and on side roads, the following is being dumped: plastics, food containers (cans and bottles etc.), household garbage, freezers, vehicle parts, tires, chemical cans, oil cans, paint/varnish, televisions, couches and other big furniture items that do not disintegrate. These unofficial dump sites attracts flies, stray dogs and wild life such as bears, raccoons and rats, which is both a health and safety concern for the residents of Frog Lake.

The following activities will help to meet the project goal/objectives:

Activity 1: Raise community awareness of the impacts of improper garbage collection and proper disposal on the heath and safety of residents and to the environment.

A consultant(s) will carry out an assessment of the community’s garbage problem and will develop an awareness plan to be distributed to all households informing them of the health and safety hazards posed by improper garbage disposal including the hazards to the environment.

Activity 2: Motivate political leadership, social and health staff to support the Smart City Challenge.

The consultant(s) will seek the support of the political leadership and social and health staff to champion this initiative.

Activity 3: Develop a community communication strategy to inform the residents of the challenge and to obtain their support.

The consultant(s) will develop a communications plan for Frog Lake residents and their partners (Beaver Lake, Cold Lake, Heart Lake, Kehewin and Whitefish Lake) to engage their support and to encourage their participation. Develop awareness campaign which will include items such as posters, stickers, magnets about the challenge in regards to a clean community.

Activity 4: Engage and encourage the participation of neighboring First Nations communities with Frog Lake as the lead.

Invite other nearby First Nations’ communities (Beaver Lake, Cold Lake, Heart Lake, Kehewin and Whitefish Lake), who are facing a similar issue, to partner and accept a similar challenge and take on similar goals/challenges.

Activity 5: Frog Lake and partnering community members will take pride in a clean and uncluttered community.

Train unemployed youth of all six partner communities about landscaping, beautification of lands and public spaces and employ them as landscapers.

(According to Indigenous Services Canada 2011 statistics, 11.9% of Frog Lake residents are unemployed (13.5% male and 10% female). However, feedback from a Frog Lake official gave a rough estimate of 80% unemployment rate of its members. Frog Lake has a very high youth population. As in other First Nations communities, about 1/3 of the population are 15 years of age or younger).

Activity 6: Train and engage the youth of Frog Lake and partner communities about proper waste collection and disposal.

Train unemployed youth of all six partner communities about proper and safe garbage disposal and collection and implement a regular garbage schedule that will employ youth and provide steady and gainful employment.

Activity 7: A new recycling program will be studied to see of the feasibility of implementation in the Frog Lake and partnering communities.

Consultant will study and research the feasibility of implementation of a regular recycling program following consultations with the community members of all six patner communities as well as with the political leadership.

Activity 8: Train the youth to manage landscape sites where garbage was disposed, clean and embellish those sites by landscaping.

Develop and implement a landscaping program to teach youth about proper grounds-keeping and beautification of outdoor areas i.e. planting trees, shrubs, flowers,and putting up fencing etc.

Inviting and involving the six communities to take part in this challenge will benefit all residents of the six partnering communities as well be of benefit to the environment in north eastern Alberta. Further, this project will lessen the number of unemployed youth, which is extremely high in those aforementioned First Nations communities and give the youth something to latch onto and take pride in. Lack of work and boredom for the youth especially has been linked to the high rates of addictions and even deaths.

Obtaining buy-in from all six communities, with Frog Lake as the lead on this innovative project, will bring about transformative social change and build community collaboration and cohesion.

Question 7

Please describe the ways in which your preliminary proposal supports your community’s medium and long-term goals, strategies, and plans.

To supplement your response, please upload any relevant documents and make clear linkages and references.
The preliminary proposal supports Frog Lake’s goals of working towards a healthy, whole and self sufficient community which includes a healthy economy. Frog Lake wishes to establish individual and joint ventures that will benefit the member First Nations of north eastern Alberta.
The community desires to develop economic capacity amongst member First Nations and to support the collective Treaty interests of the Tribal Chiefs in the area. Unemployment rates on reserve are very high, with high rates of a youth population living in Frog Lake and its partnering communities. Goals of this community are to unite and work collectively and interdependently to ensure a good future for the next seven generations of Cree First Nations. Frog Lake leaders and all leaders of the neighboring communities want to take pride in their community and live in safe, clean and beautiful environment and reclaim their stewardship of their land.

FrogLAKE _Letter of Support-beautification.pdf (174.66kb)

Question 8

Please describe your community’s readiness and ability to implement your proposal successfully.

This section should include:
•Experience with implementing complex projects (i.e. multi-stakeholder, multi-dimensional) that span multiple business lines and functional units.
•Structures, processes, and practices in place or planned for managing and implementing complex projects that span multiple business lines and functional units.
•Organizational strengths and potential weaknesses for managing and implementing a smart city proposal, and plans to address weaknesses to ensure successful proposal management and implementation.
Frog Lake already has established formal partnerships with the six neighboring communities as well as with provincial and federal government departments, educational institutions and other non-Indigenous organizations that would fully support this endeavor. For example, Frog Lake under the Tribal Chiefs Venture Inc., has formally partnered on the following:
– Implementation of Land Stewardship Training
-Memorandum of Understanding on Environment
-Agreements in Principle on Health with Alberta Health Services and Health Canada
-Agreement in Principle with Aspen View, Lakeland, Northern Lights and St. Paul School Divisions
-Education Project Study on Children not in School
-Wood Bison Recovery Project
-Aboriginal Forestry Initiative
-Contaminants Research Study (University of Ottawa)
-Indian Registration Service Delivery

Currently, Frog Lake is heading up the creation of a new Economic Development Corporation which will involve many new business ventures and in turn massively increase the economic development portfolio.

Another project manager has been working on several of Frog Lake’s new facilities and has extensive experience in multi-stakeholder projects (ie. regional water line).

Frog Lake Lands Manager, also has experience with several multi-dimensional projects from combining provincial and federal monies to complete complex land evaluations and studies.

Some potential weaknesses for implementing a smart city proposal is that this will be a new project and there is a need for specialists or consultants in this area. Further, this issue is new and few people may take this matter as being of lesser importance in comparison to other more pressing issues affecting the population of Frog Lake and neighboring communities such as: pipeline, housing and employment etc.

Strengths within the organization, is that Frog Lake has prior experience in building partnership with multi-stakeholders and managing complex projects in the community. Frog Lake and partnering communities, will be receptive to this project as it is related to the environment, which is a matter of high priority at the present time.

Question 9

Describe your plan for using the $250,000 grant, should you be selected as a finalist. Provide a high-level breakdown of spending categories and an accompanying rationale.
1- Consultant team (6 months) — $151,200.00 ($600.00/day/2 consultants)
Rationale: Due to the short time frame to develop a comprehensive proposal that will include Frog Lake and five other First Nations partners, Frog Lake will require the services of two consultants for introductory purposes and to carry out engagement session(s) in all six communities and to develop the comprehensive 2-5 year final proposal.

2- Produce awareness-raising materials such as posters, community bulletin, Face Book page, Twitter and other marketing tools regarding the hazards of improper garbage disposal and of the smart-city challenge for various age-groups — $20,000.00
Rationale: Frog Lake and neighboring communities need information in all types of formats to build awareness and to obtain their collaboration and cooperation for the smart city challenge.

3- Six engagement sessions for each of the communities. — $21,300.00 ($4,500.00 /engagement session); (catering, mileage and elder honorariums)
Rationale: An engagement session will be held in each community with the political leadership, health and environmental workers, elders and youth to support the work to be carried out in the smart city challenge over the next 2-5 years.

3- Travel (Frog Lake and surrounding communities) — $20,000.00
Travel expenses are to cover the costs for the consultants to travel to the five neighboring communities over the estimated 6 months. (Includes, car rental, accommodation, meals etc.)
Rationale: It will require several visits to neighboring communities to inform them of the challenge and to invite their participation and collaboration. As well, to investigate if these communities are experiencing the same issues.

Administration costs; $37,500.00 (Frog Lake will cover all administration costs related to this project and provide consultants with access to all information and documents required to carry out the work of the consultants).

Total: $250,000.00

Question 10

Describe the partners that are or will be involved in your proposal. Where partners are not yet determined, describe the process for selecting them.

This section should include:
•A description of existing partners (what type of organization, what they do, etc.), their relevance, and expected contribution to the outcome (or outcomes).
•Where partners are not yet determined or where it is anticipated that additional partners are required, describe the process for selecting them.
Frog Lake has already established partnerships with all neighboring six communities who are amalgamated under the Treaty 6 Confederacy as well as being an active member of the Tribal Chiefs Ventures Inc.(TCVI). The shareholders of TCVI, which is a not-for-profit corporation, includes Frog Lake, Beaver Lake, Cold Lake, Kehewin, Heart Lake and Whitefish Lake. These member shareholders meet twice a month to discuss common issues and concerns in all areas and to provide direction and guidance to the tribal council on how to move forward.

The goals of TCVI, and in line with the Smart City Challenge, are:
– To support the collective Treaty interests of the Tribal Chiefs Association;
– To establish individual and joint ventures that will benefit the member First Nations;
– To coordinate efforts to assure accountability and transparency are being fulfilled;
– To develop economic capacity amongst member First Nations both collectively and independently;
– To provide advisory and other services to member First Nations as directed.

The TCVI have established partnerships and affiliates, namely:
Member First Nations; Blue Quills First Nation college, Tribal Chiefs employment and training services association; Tribal Chiefs education foundation; Tribal Chiefs Child and Family Services East and West organizations; Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada; Environmental Canada; Health Canada; Natural Resources Canada; Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development; Alberta Health services; Alberta Aboriginal Relations; Alberta Research Council; University of Alberta; University of Ottawa; YMCA northern Alberta; Drug Smart Pharmacy; City of Edmonton; Aspen View School Division; Lakeland School Division; Northern Lights School Division; St. Paul Education; Yellowhead Tribal Council; and a number of non-governmental organizations.

On January 23, 2008, the Chiefs of TCVI and Chiefs of the Yellowhead Tribal Council entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Minister of Environment, Government of Alberta.
Where partners are not yet determined, this will be discussed first at the Chief and Council level, to gather consensus and then outreach will occur, either by email or by letter followed up by an in person meeting. The success of this project is greatly enhanced by this already established partnerships and long-standing relationships that Frog Lake has with its partners through the TCVI and with non-Indigenous partners,.